EarthsMightiest.com Start A Fansite!

A Brief History of the Motion Comic

A motion comic is a form of comics combining elements of print comic books and animation. The earliest examples of motion comics are found in independent creations such as Broken Saints.
In 2005, Lions Gate released an animated version of the Saw: Rebirth comic, one of the first examples of an animated comic created to tie into a film franchise. The first major motion comics released, which is also the first use of the term "motion comic," were released by Warner Bros., the owner of DC Comics to coincide with the film premieres of The Dark Knight and Watchmen, releasing an adaption of Batman: Mad Love and Watchmen: Motion Comics, adapting the comic book of the same name.

Marvel Comics have also begun producing motion comics,beginning with an adaptation of Joss Whedon and John Cassaday's Astonishing X-Men and a Spider-Woman series by Brian Michael Bendis and Alex Maleev produced simultaneously in print comic and motion comic formats. They have also recently announced the addition of Extremis (comics).

Examples from other companies include Peanuts Motion Comics, the Dead Space prequel comics and the "Lucy" element of the ABC News documentary Earth 2100.

Reception to motion comics has been mixed.

NewTeeVee commented, "This first generation [of motion comics] is admittedly crude, but there is enough 'motion' in these motion comics to keep the viewer’s attention, and so far the music and voice acting have been great. Plus, the level of experimentation and sophistication will grow as more are produced."

Comics Worth Reading asked, "When you add camera tricks and a soundtrack to a comic, is it still a comic? Or just a poor excuse for a cartoon, done on the cheap? Are they reaching a new audience, attracted by a new format in more modern sales outlets (that come to them)? Will those hypothetical new readers eventually wind up buying traditional-format comics? Could this be just another way to try and make more money from the same, previously existing content?"

Artist John Cassaday described his experience with the motion comic adaptation of Astonishing X-Men, saying:

"I'd seen some motion comic animation, and the quality varied. When Marvel approached me, I was initially hesitant, but after looking at some test footage and hearing how committed they were, I knew what direction they were wanting to go."









0 Yes
0 No
DCF
3/27/2010

DISCLAIMER: This posting was submitted by a user of the site not from Earth's Mightiest editorial staff. All users have acknowledged and agreed that the submission of their content is in compliance with our Terms of Use. For removal of copyrighted material, please contact us HERE.

3 Comments

I like motion comics but it still does feel like its a step below true animation. I wonder why not just go the extra step and make it a fully animated project. Money is probably the reason.
DCF - 3/27/2010, 8:11 AM
man you must really want to win this competition lol you've posted heaps of stuff, keep at it :D
Boekelaar - 3/27/2010, 8:21 AM
Thanks man!! I really do want to win this great contest but this site is so great that I'm happy to contribute as much as I can! Thanks for the encouragement!!
DCF - 3/28/2010, 9:17 PM

Please log in to post comments.

Don't have an account?
Please Register.